Mission Statement

Working in partnership with others to preserve, promote and protect the wildlife, natural beauty and historic legacy of Staunton State Park for present and future generations. 

About Staunton State Park

Staunton Cabin

Rachel Staunton at the historic cabin now part of Staunton State Park, circa 1928.

The park is the legacy of Frances H. Staunton whose parents homesteaded the site around the turn of the century. The Staunton Ranch is the heart of the park. The park's history of human uses includes ranching, the Staunton family retreat, a turn-of-the-20th century saw mill, and a sportsman's club.

Dramatic Elk Falls drops nearly 100 feet into North Elk Creek. A trail to the falls is planned and will be built once funding is available.

Elk Falls

Elk Falls

Lions Head

Lions Head

Spectacular Lions Head stands tall as the park's rocky sentry. It is visible from many trails in the park.

Staunton State Park is a mosaic of low grasslands, rocky foothills, soaring granite cliffs, and lush stream corridors. From high grassy meadows at 8,100 feet to soaring granit cliffs over 10,000 feet, the park's geology, soils, water features, and climate create a rich variety of habitats.

Bugling Elk Meadow

Bugling Elk Meadow

Bull Elk

Bull Elk

Grazing elk and mule deer favor the aspen and conifer forests. Montane grasslands are a tapestry of native wildflowers and grasses. Wet meadow systems support abundant plant and wildlife communities.

Depending on the season, visitors may see yellow-bellied marmonts, tufted-ear Abert squirrels, coyotes, or wild turkeys.

(Excerpts from Colorado Parks & Wildlife Staunton State Park brochure)

Yellow-Bellied Marmot

Yellow-Bellied Marmot


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